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Morbidity and mortality of coagulase-negative staphylococcal sepsis in very-low-birth-weight infants 
 
Morbidity and mortality of coagulase-negative staphylococcal sepsis in very-low-birth-weight infants
  Joseph B. Cantey, Kelsey R. Anderson, Ram R. Kalagiri, Lea H. Mallett
 [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]   Pageviews: 478 Times
 
Background: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the most common cause of late-onset sepsis in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and usually require vancomycin treatment. Our objective was to determine whether CoNS are associated with neonatal morbidity and mortality.
Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, °‹ 1500 g) infants from 1989 to 2015. Exclusion criteria were major congenital anomaly or death within 72 h. CoNS was considered a pathogen if recovered from °› 2 cultures, or 1 culture if treated for °› 5 days and signs of sepsis were present. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with morbidity and mortality.
Results: Of 2242 VLBW infants, 285 (12.7%) had late-onset sepsis. CoNS (125, 44%), Staphylococcus aureus (52, 18%), and Escherichia coli (36, 13%) were the most commonly recovered organisms. In multivariate analysis, CoNS sepsis was not associated with mortality [OR 0.6 (95% CI 0.2-2.6)), but sepsis with other organisms was [OR 4.5 (95% CI 2.6-8.0)]. CoNS sepsis was associated with longer hospitalization but not risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, or retinopathy of prematurity.
Conclusion: CoNS sepsis was not associated with mortality or morbidities other than length of stay. These findings support vancomycin-reduction strategies in the NICU.
 
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World Journal of Pediatric Surgery

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