Quick Search
  Home Journal Information Current Issue Past Issues Services Contact Us  
Articles
Psychiatric state of college students with a history of childhood sexual abuse 
 
Psychiatric state of college students with a history of childhood sexual abuse
  Yan-Ping Sun, Bei Zhang, Zhao-Ju Dong, Ming-Ji Yi, Dian-Feng Sun, Shou-Sen Shi
 [Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]   Pageviews: 9702 Times
   

Binzhou, China

Author Affiliations: Diagnostics Teaching and Research Office, Clinical Institute, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou 256603, China (Sun YP, Zhang B); Health Statistics Teaching and Research Office, Binzhou Medical College, Binzhou 256603, China (Dong ZJ); Department of Child Health Care, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, School of Medicine, Qingdao 266003, China (Yi MJ); Department of Pediatrics, Binzhou Vocational College, Binzhou 256600, China (Sun DF); Mental Health Teaching and Research Office, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou 256603, China (Shi SS)

Corresponding Author: Yan-Ping Sun, Department of Diagnostics, Clinical Institute, Binzhou Medical University, No. 522 3rd Huanghe Road, Binzhou 256603, China (Tel: +86-13854309245; Fax: +86-543-3162505; Email: bzsyp@163.com)

Background£º Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) seriously enfluences children's psychological status. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between CSA and the psychiatric disorders.

Methods: An anonymous and retrospective questionnaire survey was carried out in 1307 college students (aged 18-25 years; 701 females, 606 males) to investigate the participants' CSA experience by means of a complete random sampling method. The Symptom Check-List-90 (SCL-90) test was used to study the victims' psychiatric aspects.

Results: 22.11% (155/701) of the female students and 14.69% (89/606) of the male students experienced physical and/or non-physical contact CSA before age 18, with a significant difference between female and male (P<0.05). And 11.43% (80/701) of the female students and 7.26% (44/606) of the male students experienced physical contact CSA (P<0.05). Most abusers were male and young people, and only a few of them used violence. 78.7% of the females experienced non-physical contact CSA from strangers, while 71.3% experienced physical contact CSA from acquaintances. 89.9% of the male victims knew the abusers before. Females were more likely than males to experience physical contact CSA from members of the family circles. The CSA incidence increased with age in females, while 54.7% of the male victims experienced CSA from 12 to 16 years. The students who experienced CSA had higher SCL-90 scores than those who did not in somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism. The more serious the CSA experience was, the higher SCL-90 scores of the psychiatric disorders would be.

Conclusions: CSA is not uncommon in adolescents. Girls are more likely to experience CSA than boys. About half of the abusers are the victims' close relatives, neighbors and teachers; most abusers were male. Personal experience of CSA may seriously affect the victims' psychological health.

Key words: childhood; psychiatric state; sexual abuse

World J Pediatr 2008;4(4):289-294

 

 

 
  [Articles Comment]

  title Author The End Revert Time Revert / Count

  Username:
  Comment Title: 
 
   

 

     
 
     
World Journal of Pediatric Surgery

roger vivier bags 美女 美女

Home  |  Journal Information  |  Current Issue  |  Past Issues  |  Journal Information  |  Contact Us
Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, China
Copyright 2007  www.wjpch.com  All Rights Reserved Designed by eb