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Trampoline related injuries in children: risk factors and radiographic findings 
 
Trampoline related injuries in children: risk factors and radiographic findings
  Peter Klimek, David Juen, Enno Stranzinger, Rainer Wolf, Theddy Slongo
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Trampoline related injuries in children: risk factors and radiographic findings

Peter Klimek, David Juen, Enno Stranzinger, Rainer Wolf, Theddy Slongo

Bern, Switzerland

Author Affiliations: Department of Pediatric Surgery (Klimek P, Juen D, Slongo T), Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Switzerland (Stranzinger E, Wolf R)

Corresponding Author: Peter Michael Klimek, MD, Department of Pediatric Surgery University of Bern, Inselspital, CH- 3010 Bern, Switzerland (Tel: 0041 31 632 21 11; Fax: 0041 31 632 92 92; Email: peter.klimek@ksa.ch)

doi: 10.1007/s12519-013-0416-2

Background: Backyard trampolines are immensely popular among children, but are associated with an increase of trampoline-related injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographs of children with trampoline related injuries and to determine the risk factors.

Methods: Between 2003 and 2009, 286 children under the age of 16 with backyard trampoline injuries were included in the study. The number of injuries increased from 13 patients in 2003 to 86 in 2009. The median age of the 286 patients was 7 years (range: 1-15 years). Totally 140 (49%) patients were males, and 146 (51%) females.Medical records and all available diagnostic imaging were reviewed. A questionnaire was sent to the parents to evaluate the circumstances of each injury, the type of trampoline, the protection equipment and the experience of the children using the trampoline. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of the University Hospital of Bern.

Results:  The questionnaires and radiographs of the 104 patients were available for evaluation. A fracture was sustained in 51 of the 104 patients. More than 75% of all patients sustaining injuries and in 90% of patients with fractures were jumping on the trampoline with other children at the time of the accident. The most common fractures were supracondylar humeral fractures (29%) and forearm fractures (25%). Fractures of the proximal tibia occurred especially in younger children between 2-5 years of age.

Conclusions: Children younger than 5 years old are at risk for specific proximal tibia fractures ("Trampoline Fracture"). A child jumping simultaneously with other children has a higher risk of suffering from a fracture.

Key words: fracture; injuries; prevention; trampoline

World J Pediatr 2013;9(2):169-174
 
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World Journal of Pediatric Surgery

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